DRUG DROP: Investigators with the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit take in bagged prescription medications at last year’s Operation Medicine Drop. In September, the sheriff’s office collected 56,530 dosage units of pharmaceuticals ranging from pain killers to veterinary medications. (VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | DAILY NEWS)
DRUG DROP: Investigators with the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit take in bagged prescription medications at last year’s Operation Medicine Drop. In September, the sheriff’s office collected 56,530 dosage units of pharmaceuticals ranging from pain killers to veterinary medications. (VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | DAILY NEWS)

Archived Story

PD to have medicine drop-offs

Published 11:07pm Tuesday, March 19, 2013

 
Operation Medicine Drop is spreading out to the south side of the river as this week marks the spring DEA-sanctioned disposal of pharmaceutical drugs.
Police Chief David Kendricks teams up with the Aurora Woman’s Club today at the Piggly Wiggly on Fifth Street in Aurora from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., giving area residents a safe place to dispose of out of date and unused over the counter, prescription and veterinary medicines — a first for Aurora.
“I don’t think one of these has ever been done on the south side of the river — it’s always been done in Washington,” said Kendricks. “A lot of these people here can’t afford, or take the time, to travel all that way.”
Twice a year, North Carolina Operation Safe Kids and local law enforcement provide a chance to clean out the medicine cabinet, and get rid of the drugs that might prove tempting to those who would abuse them. The collected drugs are then incinerated rather than dumped down the drain or ending up in the wrong hands.
“Basically, it gives people the opportunity to rid themselves of the potential abuse by family member,” said Inv. Greg Rowe, who serves as the Diversion Officer in the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office Drug Unit. “That’s where a lot of (abuse) starts: in their own homes.”
The sheriff’s office drug unit, in conjunction with the Pamlico Tar River Foundation, will hold its drop-off in the Lowe’s Home Improvement parking lot Saturday from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., while the Washington Police Department will be next to the entrance at Walmart in Washington from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Saturday.
Lt. William Chrismon, spokesman for the police department, stressed the importance of keeping potentially dangerous drugs out of kids hands, as well as the need to dispose of drugs in the proper way.
“It ends up the public water treatment plant and they can’t fight that so it winds up back in the environment,” Chrismon said.
Medications can be dropped off anonymously, as all three events offer drive-up service where those collecting the drugs will come meet a vehicle.
But Rowe also views OMD as an informational opportunity.
“It gives people a chance to come out and talk to us — if they have any questions —in a relaxed atmosphere,” Rowe said.
For Kendricks, OMD is a chance to provide a much-needed service to his community, one that has garnered good feedback from Aurora residents.

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