BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED CONDUCTOR: Julie Sizemore, CPS's music teacher, directs students in song during the celebration.
BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED
CONDUCTOR: Julie Sizemore, CPS's music teacher, directs students in song during the celebration.

Archived Story

CPS celebrates diversity with multicultural program

Published 9:47pm Friday, April 25, 2014

 

CHOCOWINITY — During their annual multicultural program, Chocowinity Primary School students celebrated diversity and highlighted the struggles of African Americans while honoring those who brought about change.

The recent event was coordinated by Rosa Roach, a retired CPS teacher, and Rufus Moore, the school’s computer lab facilitator. The program was originally scheduled for February as part of the observance of Black History Month but had to be postponed several weeks because of inclement weather and illness.

Students taking part in this year’s project were Alexis Ward, Hailey Popperwill, Shantez Clark, Quamari Blount, Destiny Ward, Kendall Alligood, Jada Gaynor, Brandon Clark, Jaylin Oden, Toree Mayo, Laura Hodges and Vernon Collins.

 BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED VOICE: Shantez Clark, a fourth grade student at Chocowinity Primary School, spoke during the recent multicultural program
BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED
VOICE: Shantez Clark, a fourth grade student at Chocowinity Primary School, spoke during the recent multicultural program

“It is very important that the youth of today understand the many sacrifices and struggles that took place for their freedom,” Moore said. “African Americans have endured hardships so that the youth of today could dream and have equal rights. Today, our youth have the same opportunities to fulfill their dreams. If the youth really understood the struggles, they would be more appreciative. They would really take advantage of their opportunities.”

The fourth grade students taking part in the program charted black history in words and in song, from the days of slavery to modern times, according to Moore.

The Emancipation Proclamation, the Civil Rights movement, the election of President Barack Obama and the accomplishments and contributions of such noted black Americans as Rosa Parks and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. were in the spotlight.

Roach did much of the research for the program and she addressed the students, staff and guests who gathered for the festivities. She spoke about the 1960s and the struggle for equality.

“With the voices for justice came a new birth of African Americans who knew that no longer did they have to hold their heads down in shame,” Roach said. “It is fine to say it loud, I’m black and I’m proud and truly mean it.”

 

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