BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED GOOD THINKING: Sean Harris, center, was congratulated by the local law enforcement officers participating in the recent John Small Elementary School drill. Pictured left to right (front) are Officer Chris Hobbs, School Resource Officer; Trooper L.A. Peele; Harris, Betty Jane Green, principal of John Small Elementary School, and Fannie Willis, assistant principal. Back row are Sgt. Rodney Sawyer; Trooper Charles Ashley; Detective Jesse Dickinson; Lt. William Chrismon and Deputy Charnita Ricks, School Resource Officer.
BEAUFORT COUNTY SCHOOLS | CONTRIBUTED
GOOD THINKING: Sean Harris, center, was congratulated by the local law enforcement officers participating in the recent John Small Elementary School drill. Pictured left to right (front) are Officer Chris Hobbs, School Resource Officer; Trooper L.A. Peele; Harris, Betty Jane Green, principal of John Small Elementary School, and Fannie Willis, assistant principal. Back row are Sgt. Rodney Sawyer; Trooper Charles Ashley; Detective Jesse Dickinson; Lt. William Chrismon and Deputy Charnita Ricks, School Resource Officer.

Archived Story

Student shows safety skills during drill

Published 8:30pm Saturday, May 10, 2014

 

Lockdown drills are taken very seriously by Beaufort County Schools as well as each individual school within the district.  Each school in the district is required to hold a minimum of two drills per year. For the past five years or more, local law enforcement agencies have been participating in as many drills as possible. This helps them learn the campus as well as provide feedback to the schools.

During a recent drill at John Small Elementary School, one fourth grader was caught thinking on his feet and using extremely sound judgment.

Sean Harris was away from his classroom when the drill was called. When he went into the hallway to return to class, Sean said he heard doors locking. Without any supervision, Sean quickly made great choices that would have helped keep him safe had this been an actual crisis. Officers did not even see him until they called out to clear an area. Once the officer called out to see if anyone was in the area, then Sean presented himself.

“It is apparent Sean has been paying attention during drills and exercises,” explained Sarah Hodges, Beaufort County Schools Public Information Officer who also assists with school safety. “Sean was quick on his feet and kept a clear head. This is how people will survive in the event of an actual crisis. Good job Sean!”

 

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