VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | DAILY NEWS CALM BEFORE THE STORM: County, law enforcement and volunteer organizations’ officials converged on the Emergency Operations Center at Beaufort County Emergency Management Thursday night to prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Arthur.
VAIL STEWART RUMLEY | DAILY NEWS
CALM BEFORE THE STORM: County, law enforcement and volunteer organizations’ officials converged on the Emergency Operations Center at Beaufort County Emergency Management Thursday night to prepare for the arrival of Hurricane Arthur.

Archived Story

County fares well in Arthur

Published 9:08am Friday, July 4, 2014

 

Overnight from Thursday into Friday may have been filled with wind, rain and rising water, but Category 2 Hurricane Arthur left a surprisingly small wake behind it in Beaufort County.

There was zero damage to any structure and all roads were open as of 8 a.m. Friday morning, said John Pack, Beaufort County’s Emergency Management coordinator. Shelters were closed Friday morning.

The first named storm of the hurricane season formed off the coast of Florida early in the week. As it followed the Gulf Stream up the East Coast, Arthur picked up both strength and speed, coming ashore on the Outer Banks as a Category 2 hurricane.

Pack and other emergency personnel from different agencies, ranging from the Red Cross to North Carolina State Highway Patrol, monitored the storm from the emergency management office during the overnight hours. Beaufort County fared extremely well, he said.

“There was no extensive flooding. We had water rise, but we didn’t have any road that was water-locked so to speak, that we couldn’t go around it,” Pack said.

While there were a few reports of trees down in roadways, NCDOT and fire department personnel responded and cleared each quickly, he said.

Tideland EMT and Duke utilities companies announced that 864 homes were without power in Beaufort County on Friday morning. Pack said most were located in the Aurora and Blounts Creek area. The power companies assured residents that their power would be restored by 5 p.m. Friday.

Pack said he couldn’t have been more pleased with Beaufort County’s outcome.

“It went great,” he said. “This county has been through so much since January. It needed a break.”

Pack referred to several snow storms that wrought have havoc on the county, and the local school system schedule, from January until March, tornadoes on April 6 and April 25 that devastated areas from Chocowinity to Pantego, then torrential rain that flooded the City of Washington on opening night festivities of the Washington Summer Festival on June 13.

Editor's Picks

Staying safe during New Years celebrations

Whether you’re braving the natural elements and crowded streets of Times Square in New York City, or huddled up by a fire with your closest ... Read more

N.C. DMV process a work in progress

Last April, the North Carolina Division of Motor Vehicles opened up a brand new, two-story facility in Charlotte. Gone are the lengthy documents of old. ... Read more

Honoring fathers everywhere

The third Sunday every June is the time to celebrate Father’s Day. However, it hasn’t been nationally recognized for that long. The first official Father’s ... Read more