Archived Story

Write Again … The ubiquitousness of it all

Published 10:02pm Monday, February 25, 2013

You know, you just know, what she — or he — is going to say.
“How’re you guys doing? What can I get for you guys?”
Well. Maybe not those exact words. You can bet your boots “you guys” or “guys” will be used, though.
Such ubiquitous use of “guys” has now spread far beyond your “waitperson” in the restaurant. It’s used everywhere. Gender neutral.
And then there’s “Bud.” I just love being called “Bud,” especially by someone young enough to be my son, or even grandson.
Often, when addressed as “Bud” I ask, “How did you know my name?” That seems to give the person pause. Some get it. Some don’t.
“Bud.” Can you imagine someone of my generation, when we were young, addressing an older person as “Bud?” Unheard of. Or even saying “yeah.” Not acceptable.
Those days, those times, are long gone. I mean, we wouldn’t even have worn a cap inside, especially during a meal. Such practice is all too common today, most notably in restaurants.
Oh. This one I almost forgot. That same waiter or waitress (to heck with the politically correct “waitperson”) will respond to your “thank you” with, you guessed it, “no problem.”
No problem? Oh, my. Aren’t I glad it’s not a “problem” for you. Such a relief.
Every age has its own particular customs, of course, especially in language usage. Nothing new there. Same goes for the fashion-conscious of each generation. What must we wear?
Fortunately, it’s easy to get beyond such cultural trivialities.
How so? Simple. Just listen to almost any recording “artist” (I once thought artists painted, and drew, and sketched, and the like) give her or his rendition of the national anthem at some event. Terrible.
Now, that will get your mind off of language, and ball caps and such. Most certainly.

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